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GOVERNOR KASICH & KAIZEN

Ohio Governor John KasichOhio Governor John Kasich was on hand at a recent Kaizen event -- getting briefed on the team's progress and projected results, asking questions, thanking team members, expressing his support, and encouraging more people and more agencies to put Kaizen to work. He affirmed that the Administration's top priorities include increasing efficiency, removing barriers, saving money, and providing citizens with the greatest possible value for their tax dollars -- which is what Kaizen and Lean are all about.

This Kaizen event focused on the process for retaining and managing all right-of-way acquisition records. Managed by the Office of Real Estate at the Ohio Department of Transportation, it's a core process that needs to run smoothly. ODOT and local governmental agencies use the right-of-way information to develop project plans, so accuracy and quick access are crucial.

Thanks to the Kaizen team and its week of intense work, the new process will be far better -- with 50 fewer steps (82% reduction), 14 fewer handoffs (64% reduction), and up to 12 fewer months in start-to-finish process time (up to a 40% improvement). Plus, the cost to process each box of records is going from $751 to 1.
 
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Governor John Kasich visited with the Kaizen team on its fifth and final day of work. He received a briefing on the newly designed process and projected results, thanked the team for a job well done, and encouraged wider use of Lean and Kaizen throughout state government. The Administration has put an emphasis on increasing efficiency, removing barriers, saving money, and providing citizens with the greatest possible value for their tax dollars.
Members of ODOT's "Out of the Box" team: Back row, left to right: John Maynard, Central Office (CO); Cheryl Everett, District 4; Marna Mulroney, District 1; Tammy Boring, District 6; Lori Spencer, CO; Cheryl Sears, District 8; Robin Castle, District 7; Lavone Cunningham, District 12; Michael Buerger, CO; Dwight Neely, CO. Middle row, left to right: Shell Miller, District 1; Claudia Swartz, District 11; Donna Stewart, CO; Jayne Barker, CO, Jaclyn Noirot, District 2; Daveen Goodman, CO; Stephanie Castner, CO. Front row, left to right: Denae Kotheimer, CO; Katie Wood, CO; Michele Sines, District 5; Kim Allensworth, District 3.
The new process is a model of simplicity and efficiency. Compared to the old way of doing things, the new approach has 50 fewer steps (82% reduction), 14 fewer handoffs (64% reduction), and up to 12 fewer months in start-to-finish process time (up to a 40% improvement). On top of that, the cost to process each box of records will cost just $1 -- which is quite a drop from the estimated cost of $751 per box before! What did the process look like before? Hit the right-arrow key to find out...
Here's the process as it existed when the Kaizen team first went to work. Team members pooled their knowledge to create this process map themselves -- then they used it as a key part of their analysis, brainstorming, and planning as they created the streamlined process.
It's Thursday -- toward the end of the Kaizen event, when team members are nearing consensus. Here, subgroups work on different aspects of the new process and implementation plans.
A subgroup in action: People work through their questions and concerns as they reach consensus on next steps.
The team developed a plan for eliminating its entire backlog of boxes waiting to be processed. Notice that the plan spells out who does what and by when.
At every Kaizen event, teams make a point of documenting as they go. The scene above seems especially appropriate given the team's determination to take process efficiency to a higher level!