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Recommended Reading from LeanOhio

Learning to See: Value Stream Mapping to Add Value and Eliminate MUDA
by Mike Rother and John Shook
Explains how to create accurate current-state and future- state maps for each of your product families and then turn the current state into the future state rapidly and sustainably.

Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation
by Karen Martin and Mike Osterling
A practical way to deeply understand how work gets done--in any environment--and how to design improved work systems.

Personal Kanban: Mapping Work | Navigating Life
by Tonianne DeMaria Barry and Jim Benson
Provides a light, actionable, achievable framework for understanding our work and its context.

Creating a Lean Culture: Tools to Sustain Lean Conversions
by David Mann
Shows how to implement a sustainable, successful transformation by developing a culture that has your stakeholders throughout the organizational chart involved and invested in the outcome.

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement
by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox
Written like a novel, this is the story of harried plant manager desperately to try improve performance. It explains the ideas that underline the Theory of Constraints.

Performance Is the Best Politics
by Carl Waits
About the former mayor of Fort Wayne, Indiana, who led the way in putting Lean Six Sigma to work to transform the operations of city government.

The Complete Lean Enterprise: Value Stream Mapping for Office and Services
by Beau Keyte and Drew A. Locher 
Outlines a step-by-step approach for implementing Lean initiatives in service organizations and office environments.

2 Second Lean: How to Grow People and Build a Fun Lean Culture at Work & at Home
by Paul A. Akers 
No flow charts or graphs -- just the real-life journey of one company and the results that Lean thinking can produce.

Toyota Kata: Managing People for Improvement, Adaptiveness and Superior Results
by Mike Rother
Draws on six years of research into Toyota's employee-management routines, giving a detailed look at the company's organizational routines -- called kata -- that power its success with continuous improvement and adaptation.